The Darkness and the Light: A Jewish Twilight Zone Storybook
November 7, 2017

Rabbi Royi Shaffin

Inspired by an episode of Twilight Zone, the story of Sodom and Gemorah, Parashat Terumah, Merkavah literature, the upcoming Festival of Lights, and hope for a better world.

The world was completely dark when Reb Moshe woke up. Where is everyone. He walked around his house but there was no one there. He went outside to see if his neighbors were home. No one. He walked through the entire shtettle but it was deserted. He walked to the nearby shtettle of yukubitz but there was no one there either. It was the middle of winter and there should have been wind and cold but Reb Moshe felt neither. Frightened, he went back to his house. He opened the ice chest but there was no food. This didn’t seem to matter because Reb Moshe was not hungry. He sat down to study Torah. As he studied, the sun began to rise and the light of day came into his house. He enjoyed the warmth. As he continued to study, he grew hungry and wondered what he would eat. He closed his Chumash and started out the door toward the city. As he left the house, he realized that it was still night. Had he imagined the sun? Was there no light or warmth. He could have sworn that it illuminated his Chumash. Otherwise how was it that he studied without lighting a candle?
He decided to continue toward the city. When he got there, there was no one there either. Not a person existed in the shops or the marketplace or in any of the homes. No

Jews. No non-Jews. Even the church was devoid of people. Now Reb Moshe was really scared. What was happening. He felt like he was in the middle of a nightmare.
He went to the city’s grand synagogue. He knelt down before the ark and cried. Rebbono shel Olam, where am I? Where is my family. My friends? Where are all the people? He closed his eyes and concentrated intensely on reaching HaShem.
When he opened his eyes, he was no longer in the synagogue. The floor underneath him was a crystal blue. Blinding lights fluttered all around him. When he looked closely, squinting, he could see that behind the lights were human figures with wings.
A few chariots of fire flew past him carrying holy looking Jews. He walked a little and before him was a gate with two light figures standing in front. “Code word,” they asked him. Out of his mouth came words that he knew not nor understood nor understood how or why he was saying them. The gates opened. He walked some more. The terrain seemed to be taking him upward as if he was climbing a mountain. “Code word.” Again, somehow he knew the code word and the gates opened. This happened again and again as he walked through seven gates, each more grand and more beautiful than the last. He walked through the seventh gate and a blinding light brought him to his knees. I am the Lord your G-d who brought you out of the land of Egypt… the G-d of your ancestors Abraham Isaac and Jacob. Remove your shoes from your feet for the ground upon which you stand is holy ground.
Reb Moshe did as he was told. He was trembling.
“You did not accept my decree,” said the Voice.
“I do not understand,” he replied.
“I decreed that the world should be destroyed but you would not accept my decree. That is why you are here. Accept my decree and I shall build a new world out of you, my loyal servant.”
“I stopped you from carrying out a decree to destroy the world?” Reb Moshe asked incredulously.
“Yes, you and nine others,” said the Voice. “I promised your father Abraham that if there were ten righteous, I would spare it all.”
“But everything is dark. All of the people are gone.”
“Yes, the world is in limbo.”
“Please restore it,” begged Reb Moshe.
“Why?” said the voice. “What will be different?”
“What would you like?” asked Reb Moshe.
“Build me a sanctuary and I will dwell among you.”
“Terumah???!!!” Reb Moshe recognized the words instantly.
“Yes. Trumah is your guide to rebuilding the world.”
“Terumah terumah terumah” Reb Moshe said to himself. “Terumah is the guide. Asher yidveunu libo. We need to give more tzedakah. And it needs to be from the heart.”
“Yes.”
“Orot techashim. Unicorn skins. We cannot use unicorn skin if we have no more unicorns.”
“That is true.”
“We have not been taking care of your garden as you commanded.

Leovda uleshomra.”
“The two cherubs facing each other. They represent our relationship with you. When they face each other, this represents a good relationship with you oh HaShem. When they turn away from each other, that means things are bad between us. How often do we ignore the Divine call. How often do we forget about the spiritual and dwell on the physical. They also represent children studying Torah together. Your Torah has been neglected. It is by virtue of children studying Torah, it says in the Zohar, that the world exists. No wonder the world is on the brink of destruction. The cherubs also represent the love between husband and wife. Why is it that we can’t keep our marriages together? When a marriage fails, you cry and the mishkan sheds tears.
The table represents the Shabbos table. Less and less Jews have a Shabbos table. Where are the candles? Where is the kiddush? Where is the holy challah, the show bread? Where is the matza ball soup, the chicken, the kugel. Where are the zmiros, the niggunim, the vort, the benching? Where are the kinderlach running around? Where is Eshes Chayil and blessing the children? Where has Shabbos gone?
The menorah is the light of yiddishkeit. We are supposed to be upholding our end of the covenant. We are supposed to be illuminating the world with your mitzvos. No wonder it became so dark.
Ish el achiv. Isha el achota. We are supposed to be acting like brothers and sisters and we are constantly at war. You want peace. Shalom.”
“Now you understand why this has happened?” the Voice asked Reb Moshe.
“Yes? Please don’t destroy the world. We can change. We can do better.”
“Asu li Mikdash veshachanti betocham. Make the world into a holy place,” instructed the Voice, “and I shall dwell among you and within you.”
Reb Moshe turned over and felt soft material in his hands. He opened his eyes and found himself holding tight to a sheet. He was in his own house and in his own bed. Had it been a dream?
Reb Moshe got out of bed and went outside to see the the sun rise. He breathed in deeply. Time to get to work.
For more of Shepherd of Israel’s writings:

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-hollywood-bible-royi-shaffin/1127094132

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Wisdom for Life from the Source:Teachings that will make you a better person and the world a better place.
May 14, 2017

Originally published in “City Beat Magazine”

By Royi Shaffin
1) Whenever you feel like saying something negative, don’t!!!
Stop yourself before it comes out of your mouth. You can do it. Once it is out, it can’t go back in. Once you have blemished someone’s good name, you have damaged their reputation forever. It is like tearing open a feather pillow and letting the feathers out to the wind. If you change your mind, you will never be able to gather all of the feathers.
If you are a person that people listen to, your responsibility is even greater. Don’t use foul language because it pollutes the world and lowers your esteem in people’s eyes. A debate is about ideas. Criticize ideas, not people. Don’t reduce yourself to the level of a school playground. Don’t be a bully. Don’t be a victim either. Seek peace, always.
2) Wear a reminder on your hand, between your eyes, on the corners of your garments, or whatever it takes… to spread only positive energy and to protect you against the negative.
Place words of goodness and blessing, gratefulness and thankfulness, kindness and mercy upon your body. Wind them around your arm. Place them at the entrance to your home. Speak words of blessing day and night.
3) Be the source of the positive.
Find teachers and friends. In a world where a role model is hard to find, you be the role model. Create a family. Love someone. Pass your legacy on to children. Have faith in the future.

4) Give people the benefit of the doubt.
We are all human. We all make mistakes. Try to see the good in people. Believe that people have the best of intentions unless conclusively proven otherwise.
5) Be grateful for all that you have.
Pay attention to everything that people do for you and for others. Say daily affirmations for that which is good and right in the world and that for which you are grateful.

Be mindful when you eat and drink and breathe. Be grateful even when you go to the bathroom. These are all gifts. A functioning body, food to eat, clean water to drink, air to breathe, healthy lungs to breathe it with are all gifts. Do not take them for granted. Pay attention to the tastes in your mouth when you eat.

Someone put time and energy and TLC to make sure that your food tastes good.
6) Be in touch with nature.
Go outside. Take off your shoes and run around in the grass. Pay attention to the feeling of grass in between your toes. Watch the sunrise. Watch the sunset. Be grateful for being able to enjoy the beauty of the world.
Cherish animals. Make a new friend who just so happens to be a dog or a cat. Listen to the songs of the birds.
Protect the planet. Recycle. Do not waste. Don’t throw away food.

Travel the planet. Experience different people, different cultures, and different plant and animal life.
7) Be of outstanding character.
Mean what you say. Say what you mean. Don’t lie. Be a person of truth that people can depend on. Pay workers on time. If you owe money, pay on time. If you owe rent or mortgage, pay on time. If you have credit cards, pay on time. If you owe someone a phone call, call them. If you owe someone an apology, apologize.
8) Be generous with your money, your compliments, your positive facial expressions, your time, your talents, and your good will.
Visit the sick, the old, the dying, and the bereaved and send positive energy their way. Put your arm around someone who needs a hug.
9) Learn, study, read, teach, play, explore, investigate, think, be open-minded, train your brain, try new things, and try to improve as a human being.
Make yourself smarter, faster, more knowledgeable, healthier, more active. Become the best you that you can become and then try to become even better than that and while you are doing that, teach others to do the same.
10) Remember that we are all one. The entire universe is One.
The divisions between us are just an illusion. Treat your fellow human being as a brother or sister. We all come from the same place and our destiny is to all return to that place. So be kind, compassionate, loving, caring, and understanding.
May whatever positive energy you send out be returned to you seven fold.
For more of Shepherd of Israel’s writings:

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-hollywood-bible-royi-shaffin/1127094132